The Sinclair Collection
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Acorn Commodore Sinclair PCN
Calculating
Sinclair Collection
Introduction
ZX 80
ZX 81
16K Spectrum
48K Spectrum
Spectrum +
Quantum Leap
Spectrum 128
Spectrum +2
Spectrum +2A
Spectrum +3
Peripherals
Software
Books
PSUs
Programs
Cambridge Z88
Links
Acorn
Commodore
 
 
 
ZX 80
ZX 80
 
ZX 81
ZX 81
 
16K Spectrum
Spectrum
16K
48K Spectrum
Spectrum
48K
Spectrum +
Spectrum
Plus
QL
QL
Quantum Leap
 
Spectrum 128
Spectrum
128
Spectrum +2
Spectrum
+2
Spectrum +2A
Spectrum
+2A
Spectrum +3
Spectrum
+3
Peripherals
Peripherals
ZX Machines
Software
Software
Tapes and Discs
 
Books
Books
For Sinclairs
PSUs
PSUs
All Models
Programs
Programs
ZX Machines
Cambridge Z88
Cambridge
Z88
Links
Related
Links
   
Contents
Click an image above or a link below for details
ZX 80 The one that started it, ready built or in kit form.
ZX 81 1KB expandable to 16K - Wow!! This was many people's introduction to computers.
16K Spectrum Colour and sound in an easy to use machine . . .
48K Spectrum . . . and then a massive 48K memory!
Spectrum + A new keyboard and a more professional look.
Quantum Leap The shape of things to come?
Spectrum 128 The biggest Spectrum yet.
Spectrum +2 The Amstrad Spectrum.
Spectrum +2A Back to black.
Spectrum +3 Disc drive version.
Peripherals Add-ons to get the most from your machine.
Software Cassette tapes for ZX81 and Spectrum, discs for the Spectrum +3.
Books Getting more from your Sinclair computer.
PSUs Power supplies - ZX80 to Plus 3.
Programs A selection of my programs to download or type in.
Cambridge Z88 And finally, a last offering from Sir Clive.
Links Links to Sinclair related sites.
The Sinclair Museum.
The story of the Sinclair computer range is the story of the early days of home computing in the UK. Clive Sinclair was a British entrepreneur who had produced radios, calculators and watches. Always innovative, his ideas caught the attention but were not always commercially successful.
The first computer from the Sinclair stable was the MK14 board for hobbyists in 1978 and the last was the PC200 in 1988 although neither of these was a truly Sinclair product. In between there was an exciting eight years which saw home computing transformed from an interest for the few to something few could imagine living without. The brand wasn't just popular in the UK either. In North America, Sinclair computers and derivatives were produced by Timex and in communist eastern Europe the Spectrum was copied by several manufacturers.
The MK14, produced by Science of Cambridge, was a board holding a machine code monitor in ROM, 256 bytes of RAM, a calculator style keyboard and display, and I/O ports. Although we would not recognise it as a computer in the modern sense, without it there might never have been a UK computer industry. It not only led an initially unenthusiastic Clive Sinclair to the Sinclair ZX range but the MK14 was developed by Chris Curry who left the company to form Acorn Computers of BBC fame.
From the very basic ZX80 through the millions of Spectrums to the failure of the QL, the Sinclair range found its way into the homes and hearts of the nation. Many are still there. The ones here found their way into mine . . . .
   
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